Get Out
Story / Atmosphere 4
Character Development 4
Cinematography 4
Special Effects 4
Sound / Music 4

Photographer Chris Washington is nervous about meeting his girlfriend Rose’s parents for the first time, especially when he learns that she has not told them

Summary 4.0 Great
Story / Atmosphere 0
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Get Out

Photographer Chris Washington is nervous about meeting his girlfriend Rose’s parents for the first time, especially when he learns that she has not told them that he is black. Their awkward behavior, along with the oddness exhibited by their two African-American servants, puts Chris on alert but even so, he is unprepared for the family’s true motivations.

This film was enjoyable and so much fun! It was like straight out of the old Twilight Zone TV series or the Stepford Wives, no kidding. Truly a great movie all around, from the incredible acting to the smooth flow of the plot, it was very well done. The doesn’t drag out either, nor does it move too quickly which is perfection in today’s movie standards. The idea behind this movie was original, and the acting was phenomenal. The way each character was portrayed was spot on.

There’s certainly a great amount of humor in this movie. Kaluuya’s character, Chris, gets tangled up in a sinister conspiracy at his white girlfriend’s secluded family estate, while his over-excitable friend Rod provides even more comic relief from all the hysterical cellphone conversations. It’s actually Rod who correctly concludes that Chris is trapped in a real-life horror movie.

From the beginning, something was off with the young photographer’s trip to the Armitage estate, home to his white girlfriend Rose’s parents. Chris’ disturbing therapy session with Missy, an encounter with the man formerly known as Andre, and the foreboding auction are all warning signs, but the cherry on the top of this fright-mare starts with the discovery of Rose’s not-so-diverse dating history.

The scene when Chris falls under hypnosis by his prospective mother-in-law, played by Catherine Keener, was completely horrifying and disturbing. Jordan Peele recalls, “It’s a horror movie. I’ve got to give them a scary scene, and I want to make this one of the scariest scenes of all time.” So for inspiration, he turned to Jonathan Demme’s Silence of the Lambs.

GrimMagazine.com - Get Out - Movie Review

(2017) Get Out Movie Still

 

Parents need to know that this film issues related to race, but in a very thoughtful way. In many ways, it’s an essential movie of its moment, but it still has plenty of mature material, making it more suitable for older teens and up. Violence isn’t at a constant but it’s definitely hard-core when it does come ups, with fighting, bashing with blunt objects, kicking, stabbing, guns, shooting, and lots of blood. There’s also a gory surgery scene and a deer that’s hit by a car and shown injured and bleeding. Language is really strong, with many uses of “f–k,” “mother f—-r,” “s–t,” and even the “N” word, as well as some very vivid sex talk. On a more mellow note, we have plenty of kissing, with characters drinking in social situations; minor characters are shown drunk, and a story is told about teen drinking. One of the more major characters is trying to quit smoking, though you never really see him in the act.

GrimMagazine.com - Get Out - Movie Review

(2017) Get Out Movie Still

 

The alternate ending was surprising, but I’m happy with the ending that was used. I believe that this movie delves further than on matters of race, I think that there are points to the story that is completely relatable. It covers a good deal on issues of trust with others, and one’s own judgment as well. I absolutely adored the character, Chris. He has a superb way of pulling you in to the point where you can watch the story unfold through his eyes. To be honest, though, I am not too quick in giving most movies a good review or a thumbs-up. That being said if you want an exciting, deep, thrilling, and initially confusing in a good way movie, I highly suggest you give this refreshing movie a chance.

 

GrimMagazine.com - Get Out - Movie Review
Title: Get Out
Release Date: February 24, 2017
Runtime: 1 hour, 44 minutes
Genre: Horror, Mystery, Thriller
Studio: Universal Pictures
Starring: Daniel Kaluuya, Allison Williams, Bradley Whitford
MPAA Rated: R
Directors: Jordan Peele
Reviewed by: Sarah Hopkins
Our Rating: 4.0 /5

 

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